U.S. Politics

Election 2016 News

US Elections: What's At Stake In 2016?

Why the 2016 Presidential Election Could Impact Your Way Of Living For Generations to Come

Democrats and Republicans The 2016 Presidential Election is crucial to both Republicans and Democrats since the next President of the United States could nominate as many as four Supreme Court justices. As many as four seats on the Supreme Court could become vacant during the next few years with four supreme court justices over the age of 80. This means the next president could have the power to transform the supreme court, and American law, for generations to come. (See Election Dates and Deadlines)

President Barack Obama The United States presidential election of 2016 is an Open Race since the Incumbent Democratic President Barack Obama is term-limited and cannot run for re-election to a third term in office.

President Obama was sworn in as the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009, and was sworn in for his second term on January 20, 2013.
(Browse 2016 Presidentials)

2016 US Senators races

In 2016, there will be US Senators races in 34 States including US territories. Of the 34 US Senator seats up for election this election cycle, 24 seats are currently held by Republicans, and 10 are held by Democrats. It is important to note that 28 incumbents are running for re-election and the rest (6 seats) are open races with no incumbent running.

  • Current US Senator is a Republican
  • Current US Senator is a Democrat

Alaska US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Lisa Murkowski, is running for re-election to a third term in office. An unsuccessful candidate for re-nomination in 2010, she ran as a write-in candidate. Senator Lisa Murkowski won re-election to the United States Senate with 39.3% of the vote. She defeated Joe Miller (R) and Scott T. McAdams (D). (see current elected officials in Alaska)

Alabama US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Richard Shelby, is running for re-election to a sixth term in office. On November 2, 2010, Richard Shelby won re-election to the United States Senate with 65.2% of the vote against the democratic candidate, William Barnes, who came in a distant second with 34.7% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Alabama)

Arkansas US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, John Boozman, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, John Boozman won the election to the United States Senate with 57.9% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Blanche Lincoln, who came in a distant second with 37.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Arkansas)

Arizona US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, John McCain, is running for re-election to a sixth term in office. On November 2, 2010, John McCain won re-election to the United States Senate with 59.1% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Rodney Glassman, who came in a distant second with 34.8% of the vote. The libertarian candidate, David Nolan, was third with 4.7% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Arizona)

Georgia US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Johnny Isakson, is running for re-election to a third term in office. On November 2, 2010, Johnny Isakson won the election to the United States Senate with 58.3% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Michael Thumond, who came in a distant second with 39.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Georgia)

Iowa US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Chuck Grassley, is running for re-election to a seventh term in office. On November 2, 2010, Chuck Grassley won the election to the United States Senate with 64.4% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Roxanne Conlin, who came in a distant second with 33.3% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Iowa)

Idaho US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Mike Crapo, is running for re-election to a fourth term in office. On November 2, 2010, Mike Crapo won the election to the United States Senate with 71.2% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Tom Sullivan, who came in a distant second with 24.9% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Idaho)

Illinois US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Mark Kirk, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Mark Kirk won the election to the United States Senate with 48.0% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, A. Giannoulias, who came in second with 46.4% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Illinois)

Kansas US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Jerry Moran, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Jerry Moran won the election to the United States Senate with 70.1% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, A. Giannoulias, who came in a distant second with 26.4% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Kansas)

Kentucky US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Rand Paul, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Rand Paul won the election to the United States Senate with 55.7% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Jack Conway, who came in a distant second with 44.3% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Kentucky)

Missouri US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Roy Blunt, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Roy Blunt won the election to the United States Senate with 54.2% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Robin Carnahan, who came in a distant second with 40.6% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Missouri)

North Carolina US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Richard Burr, is running for re-election to a third term in office. On November 2, 2010, Richard Burr won the election to the United States Senate with 54.8% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Elaine Marshall, who came in a distant second with 43.1% of the vote. (see current elected officials in North Carolina)

North Dakota US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, John Hoeven, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, John Hoeven won the election to the United States Senate with 76.2% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Tracy Potter, who came in a distant second with 22.2% of the vote. (see current elected officials in North Dakota)

New Hampshire US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Kelly Ayotte, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Kelly Ayotte won the election to the United States Senate with 60.2% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Paul Hodes, who came in a distant second with 36.8% of the vote. (see current elected officials in New Hampshire)

Ohio US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Rob Portman, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Rob Portman won the election to the United States Senate with 56.9% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Lee Fisher, who came in a distant second with 39.4% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Ohio)

Oklahoma US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, James Lankford, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 4, 2014, James Lankford won the special election to the United States Senate with 67.9% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Connie Johnson, who came in a distant second with 29.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Oklahoma)

Pennsylvania US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Pat Toomey, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Pat Toomey won the election to the United States Senate with 51.0% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Joe Sestak, who came in second with 49.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Pennsylvania)

South Carolina US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Tim Scott, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 4, 2014, Tim Scott won the special election to the United States Senate with 61.2% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Joyce Dickerson, who came in a distant second with 37.1% of the vote. (see current elected officials in South Carolina)

South Dakota US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, John Thune, is running for re-election to a third term in office. On November 2, 2010, John Thune won the special election to the United States Senate uncontested. (see current elected officials in South Dakota)

Utah US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Mike Lee, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Mike Lee won the election to the United States Senate with 61.6% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Sam Granato, who came in a distant second with 32.8% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Utah)

Wisconsin US Senator Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Senator, Ron Johnson, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Ron Johnson won the election to the United States Senate with 51.9% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Russ Feingold, who came in second with 47.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Wisconsin)

Florida US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Republican Senator, Marco Rubio is not running for re-election. On November 2, 2010, Marco Rubio won election to the United States Senate with 48.9% of the vote against the Independent candidate, Charlie Crist, who came in a distant second with 29.7% of the vote. The Democratic candidate, Kendrick B. Meek was third with 20.2% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Florida)

Indiana US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Republican Senator, Daniel Coats, is not running for re-election. On November 2, 2010, Daniel Coats won re-election to the United States Senate with 54.6% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Brad Ellsworth, who came in a distant second with 40.0% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Indiana)

Louisiana US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Republican Senator, David Vitter is not running for re-election. On November 2, 2010, David Vitter won re-election to the United States Senate with 56.6% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Charlie Melancon, who came in a distant second with 37.7% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Louisiana)

California US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Senator,Barbara Boxer, is retiring. On November 2, 2010, Barbara Boxer won re-election to the United States Senate with 52.2% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Carla Fiorina, who came in a distant second with 42.2% of the vote. (see current elected officials in California)

Maryland US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Senator,Barbara Mikulski, is retiring. On November 2, 2010, Barbara Mikulski won re-election to the United States Senate with 62.3% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Eric Wargotz, who came in a distant second with 35.8% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Maryland)

Nevada US Senator Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Senator,Harry Reid, is retiring. On November 2, 2010, Harry Reid won re-election to the United States Senate with 50.3% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Sharon Angle, who came in second with 44.5% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Nevada)

Colorado US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Michael Bennet, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Michael Bennet won the election to the United States Senate with 48.1% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Ken Buck, who came in second with 46.4% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Colorado)

Connecticut US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Richard Blumenthal, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 2, 2010, Richard Blumenthal won the election to the United States Senate with 55.2% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Linda McMahon, who came in a distant second with 43.2% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Connecticut)

Hawaii US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Brian Schatz, is running for re-election to a second term in office. On November 4, 2014, Brian Schatz won the election to the United States Senate with 69.8% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Cam Cavasso, who came in a distant second with 27.7% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Hawaii)

New York US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Chuck Schumer, is running for re-election to a fourth term in office. On November 2, 2010, Chuck Schumer won the election to the United States Senate with 66.3% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Jay Towsend, who came in a distant second with 32.2% of the vote. (see current elected officials in New York)

Oregon US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Ron Wyden, is running for re-election to a fith term in office. On November 2, 2010, Ron Wyden won the election to the United States Senate with 57.3% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Jim Huffman, who came in a distant second with 39.3% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Oregon)

Vermont US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Patrick Leahy, is running for re-election to an 8th term in office. On November 2, 2010, Patrick leahy won the election to the United States Senate with 64.4% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Len Britton, who came in a distant second with 30.9% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Vermont)

Washington US Senator Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Senator, Patty Murray, is running for re-election to a fith term in office. On November 2, 2010, Patty Murray won the election to the United States Senate with 52.4% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Dino Rossi, who came in second with 47.6% of the vote. (see current elected officials in Washington)

2016 Governors races

In 2016, there will be Governors races in 13 States including US territories. Of the 13 Governor seats up for election this election cycle, 4 seats are currently held by Republicans, and 9 are held by Democrats. It is important to note that 6 incumbents are running for re-election and the rest (7 seats) are open races with no incumbent running.

  • Current Governor is a Democrat
  • Current Governor is a Republican

Delaware Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Governor Jack Markell is term-limited and cannot run for re-election to a third term in office.
Jack Markell was sworn in as Delaware's governor on January 19, 2009, and was sworn in for his second term on January 15, 2013. He has focused on economic development, education and workforce training as top priorities.
Governor Markel won his re-election in 2012 with close to 70% of the vote (see 2012 election results)

Missouri Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Governor Jay Nixon is term-limited and cannot run for re-election to a third term in office. Jeremiah W. (Jay) Nixon became governor of Missouri on January 11, 2009, and was sworn in for his second term in 2012.
Governor Nixon won his re-election in 2012 with 54.7% of the vote. His Republican opponent , Dave Spence, was a distant second with 42.6% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

New Hampshire Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Governor Maggie Hassan is eligible to for re-election to a third term in office, but she has announced she will run for the U.S. Senate against Senator Kelly Ayotte. Maggie Hassan was sworn in as governor of New Hampshire on January 3, 2013, and was sworn in for her second term on January 7, 2015.
New Hampshire and Vermont are the only states in the country whose Governors are elected every two years.
Governor Hassan won a very competitive race in 2014 with 52.6.0% of the vote against the republican candidate Walt Havenstein who came in second with 47.4% of the vote. (see 2014 election results)

Puerto Rico Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent PPD Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla is not running for re-election.
Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla was sworn in as governor of Puerto Rico on January 2, 2013.

Vermont Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Governor Peter Shumlin has decided not to run for re-election to a fourth term in office. Peter Shumlin was sworn in as governor of Vermont on January 6, 2011, and was sworn in for his second term on January 10, 2013. He was sworn in for his third consecutive term on January 8, 2015.
New Hampshire and Vermont are the only states in the country whose Governors are elected every two years.
Governor Shumlin won a very competitive race in 2014 with 46.4% of the vote against the republican candidate Scott Milne who came second with 45.3% of the vote. (see 2014 election results)

West Virginia Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin is term-limited and cannot run for re-election to a third term in office. Earl Ray Tomblin was sworn in as governor of West Virginia on November 13, 2011, and was sworn in for his second term on January 14, 2013.

Governor Tomblin won a very close race in 2012 with 50.5% of the vote against the republican candidate Bill Maloney who came second with 45.7% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Montana Governor Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Governor Steve Bullock is running for re-election to a second term in office. Steve Bullock was sworn in as governor of Montana on January 7, 2013. Since taking office, Bullock has prioritized responsible fiscal management for Montana, while working to bring better jobs, better education and a more effective government to the state.
Governor Bullock won a very competitive race in 2012 with 49.0% of the vote against the republican candidate Rick Hill who came second with 47.3% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Oregon Governor Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

This election will determine who fills the remaining two years of the term of Democratic Governor John Kitzhaber, who was re-elected in 2014 and resigned in 2015. The incumbent governor is Democrat Kate Brown, who succeeded to the governor's office as Oregon Secretary of State.
Former governor Kitzhaber won a close race in 2014 with 49.8% of the vote against the republican candidate Dennis Richardson who came second with 44.7% of the vote. (see 2014 election results)

Washington Governor Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Governor Jay Inslee is running for re-election to a second term in office. Jay Inslee was sworn in as governor of Washington on January 16, 2013.
Under Washington's nonpartisan blanket primary law, all candidates appear on the same ballot, regardless of party. In the primary, which will be held on August 5, 2016, voters may vote for any candidate, regardless of their party affiliation. The top two finishers, regardless of party, advance to the general election in November.

Governor Inslee won a very competitive race in 2012 with 51.2% of the vote against the republican candidate Rob McKenna who came second with 48.8% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Indiana Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Governor Mike Pence is running for re-election to a second term in office. Mike Pence was sworn in as governor of Indiana on January 14, 2013.
Governor Pence won a very competitive race in 2012 with 49.6% of the vote against the democratic candidate John R. Gregg who came second with 46.4% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

North Carolina Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Governor Pat McCrory is running for re-election to a second term in office. Pat McCrory was sworn in as governor of North Carolina on January 5, 2013.
Governor McCrory won the gubernatorial race in 2012 with 54.7% of the vote against the democratic candidate Walter H. Dalton who came second with 43.2% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Utah Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Governor Gary Herbert is running for re-election to a third term in office. Gary Herbert was sworn in as Utah's 17th governor on August 11, 2009, and was sworn in for his second term on January 7, 2013. He currently serves as the NGA chair.
As governor, Herbert is focused on four cornerstones to strengthen Utah's economy: education, energy, jobs, and the ability of the state to solve its own problems.
Governor Herbert won the gubernatorial race in 2012 with 68.4% of the vote against the democratic candidate Peter S. Cooke who came in a distant second with 27.7% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

North Dakota Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Republican Governor Jack Dalrymple has announced that he will not run for re-election to a second term in office. Jack Dalrymple was sworn in as governor of North Dakota on December 7, 2010, and was sworn in for his second term on December 15, 2012.
Governor Dalrymple won the gubernatorial race in 2012 with 63.2% of the vote against the democratic candidate Ryan M. Taylor who came in a distant second with 34.3% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

2016 Lt. Governors races

In 2016, there will be Lt. Governors races in 9 States including US territories. Of the 9 Lt. Governor seats up for election this election cycle, 6 seats are currently held by Republicans, and 3 are held by Democrats. It is important to note that 7 incumbents are running for re-election and the rest (2 seats) are open races with no incumbent running.

  • Current Lt. Governor is a Democrat
  • Current Lt. Governor is a Republican

Delaware Lt. Governor Race - Open Race

The office has been vacant since January 6, 2015, when previous Lt. Gov. Matthew Denn resigned to become state attorney general. Denn, a Democrat first elected lieutenant governor in 2008 and re-elected in 2012, quit the position two years before he was scheduled to complete his four-year term. (see 2012 election results)

Montana Lt. Governor Race - Open Race

Incumbent Angela McLean (D) announced on November 30, 2015, that she would step down at the end of 2015. Governor Steve Bullock (D) appointed former Secretary of State Mike Cooney (D) as his new lieutenant governor on December 30, 2015, he was sworn in January 4, 2016. (see 2012 election results)

Washington Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Lt. Governor Brad Owen is running for re-election to a 5th term in office. He was first elected in 1996 and won re-election in 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012.
Under Washington's nonpartisan blanket primary law, all candidates appear on the same ballot, regardless of party. In the primary, which will be held on August 5, 2016, voters may vote for any candidate, regardless of their party affiliation. The top two finishers — regardless of party — advance to the general election in November.

Brad Owen won the 2012 race with 53.7% of the vote against the republican candidate, Bill Finkbeiner, who came second with 46.3% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Indiana Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Sue Ellspermann is running for re-election. On November 6, 2012,Sue Ellspermann, running on a ticket with Mike Pence, defeated Vi Simpson (D) in a very competive race with 49.5% of the votes. The democratic candidate, Vi Simpson, came in second with 46.6% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

Missouri Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Peter Kinder is running for re-election to a fourth term in office. Missouri elects lieutenant governors in presidential elections (leap years). For Missouri, 2004, 2008, 2012 and 2016 are all lieutenant gubernatorial election years.
Peter Kinder won his re-election in 2012 with 49.4% of the vote. His Democratic oponent , Susan Montee, was a close second with 45.4% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

North Carolina Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Dan Forest is running for re-election to a second term in office. The lieutenant governor is limited to serving two four-year terms in office.
Dan Forest won a very competitive race in 2012 with 50.2% of the vote against the democratic candidate, Linda Coleman, who came second with 49.8% of the vote. (see 2012 election results)

North Dakota Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican lieutenant Governor, Drew Wrigley, was first appointed in 2010 to replace Jack Dalrymple (R) when Dalrymple succeeded to the governor's office. Wrigley won a full, four-year term as lieutenant governor in the November 2012 general election. (see 2012 election results)

Utah Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Lieutenant Governor Spencer Cox is running for re-election to a second term in office. Spencer Cox was sworn in as Utah's 8th governor on October 16, 2013. Cox was named to replace Greg Bell (R), who resigned the office in September 2013 citing financial reasons.
(see 2012 election results)

Vermont Lt. Governor Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

The 79th and current lieutenant governor is Phillip Scott, a Republican first elected in 2010. Scott was re-elected to the office in 2012 and 2014.
New Hampshire and Vermont are the only states in the country whose Governors are elected every two years.
Phillip Scott won the 2014 race with 62.3% of the vote against the progressive candidate Dean Corren who came a distant second with 36.0% of the vote. (see 2014 election results)

2016 Att. Generals races

In 2016, there will be Att. Generals races in 10 States including US territories. Of the 10 Att. General seats up for election this election cycle, 4 seats are currently held by Republicans, and 6 are held by Democrats. It is important to note that 6 incumbents are running for re-election and the rest (4 seats) are open races with no incumbent running.

  • Current Att. General is a Republican
  • Current Att. General is a Democrat

Indiana Att. General Race - Open Race

Incumbent Republican Attorney General, Greg Zoeller, is not running for re-election. Greg Zoeller won the 2012 elections with 58.1% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Kay Fleming, who came in second with 41.9% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Indiana)

Montana Att. General Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Attorney General, Tim Fox, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Tim Fox won the 2012 elections with 53.6% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Pam Bucy, who came in second with 46.4% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Montana)

Utah Att. General Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Attorney General, Sean Reyes, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Initially appointed to succeed Swallow and then the winner of a special election in 2010. Sean Reyes won the spacial election with 62.7% of the vote against the Democratic candidate, Charles Stormont, who came in a distant second with 27.5% of the vote. (see 2014 Election results in Utah)

West Virginia Att. General Race - Incumbent (Republican) Running

Incumbent Republican Attorney General, Patrick Morrisey, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Patrick Morrisey won a very competitive race in 2012 with 51.3% of the vote against the incumbent Democratic candidate, Darrell McGraw, who came in second with 48.7% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in West Virginia)

Missouri Att. General Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, Chris Koster, is running for Governor in 2016. Chris Koster won the 2012 elections with 55.8% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Ed Martin, who came in a distant second with 40.7% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Missouri)

North Carolina Att. General Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, Roy Cooper, is running for Governor in 2016. Roy Cooper was re-elected to a fourth term in office in 2012. He was unopposed in both the Democratic primary and the general election. (see 2012 Election results in North Carolina)

Vermont Att. General Race - Open Race

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, William Sorrell, is retiring after serving for 18 years, nine consecutive terms. William Sorrell won the 2014 elections with 58.6% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Shane McGormack, who came in a distant second with 37.4% of the vote. (see 2014 Election results in Vermont)

Oregon Att. General Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, Ellen Rosenblum, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Ellen Rosenblum won the 2012 elections with 56.2% of the vote against the Republican candidate, James Buchal, who came in second with 39.4% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Oregon)

Pennsylvania Att. General Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, Kathleen Kane, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Kathleen Kane won the 2012 elections with 56.1% of the vote against the Republican candidate, David Freed, who came in a distant second with 41.6% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Pennsylvania)

Washington Att. General Race - Incumbent (Democrat) Running

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General, Bob Ferguson, is running for re-election to a second term in office. Bob Ferguson won the 2012 elections with 53.1% of the vote against the Republican candidate, Reagan Dunn, who came in second with 46.9% of the vote. (see 2012 Election results in Washington)

Upcoming Dates

California - Mayoral General Election-

May
1

Burbank Mayoral Election - Current Mayor: Bob Frutos - Population(103,340)
May Mayor Elect takes office 5/1/2015.

Upcoming Presidential Debates
2016 Republican National Convention

Cleveland, Ohio - July: 18-21


Delegates to the Convention: 2,472


Delegates Needed to Win the Nomination (50%+1): 1,237

Republican National Convention

The 2016 Republican National Convention, in which delegates of the United States Republican Party will choose the party's nominees for President of the United States and Vice President of the United States in the 2016 national election will be held July 18 - 21, 2016. The Convention is to be held at the Quicken Loans Arena in Cleveland, Ohio

The Quicken Loans Arena is located in downtown Cleveland, and referred to locally as "The Q". The multipurpose arena seats 20,500, and includes 2,000 club seats and 88 luxury suites. It is home to three professional sports teams and hosts numerous entertainment events. Other supporting venues within walking distance of 2016 RNC main venue include the Cleveland Convention Center and the Renaissance Cleveland Hotel.

The Republican nominee will be chosen by primary voters and delegates, and each state determines the date and format of their own primary process.

Useful Links

2016 Democratic National Convention

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania - July: 25-28


Delegates to the Convention:


Delegates Needed to Win the Nomination (50%+1):

Democratic National Convention venue

The 2016 Democratic National Convention, in which delegates of the United States Democratic Party will choose the party's nominees for President of the United States and Vice President of the United States in the 2016 national election will be held July 25 - 28, 2016. The Convention is to be held at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, with some events at the Pennsylvania Convention Cente.

The Wells Fargo Center is the home arena of the Philadelphia Flyers of the National Hockey League, the Philadelphia 76ers of the National Basketball Association, and the Philadelphia Soul of the Arena Football League. The Wells Fargo Center officially seats 20,318 for NBA and NCAA basketball and 19,541 for NHL hockey. The Wells Fargo Center lies at the southwest corner of the South Philadelphia Sports Complex, which includes Lincoln Financial Field, Citizens Bank Park, and Xfinity Live!

Useful Links

Voting And Elections

About Voting

Voting is the essence of democracy. Voting in the United States is voluntary. Some people vote in person at the polls, while others vote by mail days or weeks before the actual election date. It's important that all U.S. citizens who qualify to vote participate in the democratic process of electing public officials. Locate your local registrar office

Address Changed

When you register to vote, your voter registration is linked to your residential address. When registered voters move, they are supposed to update their registration records with election officials before voting.
Under federal law, if you move within 30 days of a presidential election, you are allowed to vote for President and Vice President in your former state of residence, either in person or by absentee ballot.

Click this link to browse state by state voting guide

Early Voting

In 33 states and the District of Columbia, any qualified voter may cast a ballot in person during a designated period prior to Election Day. No excuse or justification is required.

Absentee Voting

All states will mail an absentee ballot to certain voters. The voter may return the ballot by mail or in person. In 20 states, an excuse is required, while 27 states and the District of Columbia permit any qualified voter to vote absentee without offering an excuse. Some states offer a permanent absentee ballot list: once a voter asks to be added to the list, s/he will automatically receive an absentee ballot for all future elections.

Mail Voting

Two states -- Oregon and Washington -- conduct all elections by mail. A ballot is automatically mailed to every registered voter in advance of Election Day, and traditional in-person voting precincts are not available. Learn more about Oregon's vote-by-mail program

Voter identification (ID) requirements

There are several situations when voters need to show identification before voting. Usually, ID is required to prove the voter's identity and residency at the address of the registration. A total of thirty-four states have passed voter ID laws. These are not all in force at this point, either because the implementation date is in the future or because of court challenges.

States that Require ID (Photo ID, Non Photo ID)

  • Alabama
  • Alaska
  • Arkansas
  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Louisiana
  • Michigan
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • New Hampshire
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oklahoma
  • Rhode Island
  • South Carolina
  • South Dakota
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Virginia
  • Washington,

Note:

  • A state judge temporarily blocked enforcement of Pennsylvania's new voter ID law.
  • New voter ID law has not yet been implemented;state presently has no voter ID law in effect. North Carolina's goes into effect in 2016
  • Mississippi's new voter ID law was passed via the citizen initiative process. It will be used for the first time in 2014.
  • Wisconsin's voter ID law was declared unconstitutional on March 12, 2012. Dane County Circuit Judge Richard Niess issued a permanent injunction barring enforcement of the law, which the state has said it will appeal.
  • The new strict photo ID law in Arkansas will take effect on January 1, 2014, or when the funding to the Secretary of State for the issuance of free IDs for voting purposes has been appropriated and is available.
  • Virginia's strict photo ID requirement takes effect on July 1, 2014. Until then, a strict non-photo ID law remains in effect.

Federal Employees

The Office Of Personnel Management (OPM) has advised Federal agencies that where the polls are not open at least 3 hours either before or after an employee's regular work hours, an agency may grant a limited amount of excused absence to permit the employee to report for work 3 hours after the polls open or leave from work 3 hours before the polls close, whichever requires the lesser amount of time off. An employee's "regular work hours" should be determined by reference to the time of day the employee normally arrives at and departs from work.

Note:

For example, if an employee is scheduled to work from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and the employee's polling place is open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m., the employee should not be granted excused absence for voting, since the employee would still have at least 3 hours after the end of his or her workday to vote. However, if an employee is scheduled to work from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and the employee's polling place is open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., the employee may be granted 1/2 hour of excused absence from 4:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., if requested.

Private-Sector Employees

Time Off To Vote Laws vary by state.Many states have laws that require private employers to give employees time off to vote. The laws vary among states, and time-off for voting may only be required under certain circumstances. In addition, state law may require that the employee must be paid for this time.

U.S. Supreme Court

Overview


The Supreme Court consists of the Chief Justice of the United States and such number of Associate Justices as may be fixed by Congress. The number of Associate Justices is currently fixed at eight. Supreme Court justices, court of appeals judges, and district court judges are nominated by the President and confirmed by the United States Senate, as stated in the Constitution. The names of potential nominees are often recommended by senators or sometimes by members of the House who are of the President's political party. The Senate Judiciary Committee typically conducts confirmation hearings for each nominee. Article III of the Constitution states that these judicial officers are appointed for a life term.

Supreme Court Justices

There have been as few as six Supreme Court Justices, but since 1869 there have been nine Justices, including one Chief Justice. Federal courts enjoy the sole power to interpret the law, determine the constitutionality of the law, and apply it to individual cases.

Court Officers

Court Officers assist the Court in the performance of its functions. They include the Counselor to the Chief Justice, the Clerk, the Librarian, the Marshal, the Reporter of Decisions, the Court Counsel, the Curator, the Director of Information Technology, and the Public Information Officer. The Counselor is appointed by the Chief Justice. The Clerk, Reporter of Decisions, Librarian, and Marshal are appointed by the Court. All other Court Officers are appointed by the Chief Justice in consultation with the Court.

Current Supreme Court Justices

Chief Justice Roberts

Chief Justice John G. Roberts (MD) (Born in 1955)

Appointed by: President G. W. Bush - Republican in 2005

Political View: Chief Justice Roberts has been described as having a conservative judicial philosophy in his jurisprudence

Education: Harvard College-- Harvard University

Justice Scalia

Associate Justice Antonin Scalia (VA) (Born in 1936)

Appointed by: President Reagan -Republican in 1986

Political View: Scalia has staked out a conservative ideology in his opinions, advocating textualism in statutory interpretation and originalism in constitutional interpretation.

Education: Georgetown University -- University of Fribourg -- Harvard Law School

Justice Kennedy

Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy (CA) (Born in 1936)

Appointed by: Republican - Reagan in 1988

Political View: Kennedy has often been the swing vote on many of the Court's 5-4 decisions

Education: Stanford University -- London School of Economics -- Harvard Law School

Justice Thomas

Associate Justice Clarence Thomas (GA) (Born in 1948)

Appointed by: President G. H. Bush -Republican in 1991

Political View: Thomas is generally viewed as the most conservative member of the Court

Education: Conception Seminary College -- College of the Holy Cross -- Yale Law School

Justice Ginsburg

Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (NY) (Born in 1933)

Appointed by: President B. Clinton -Democrat in 1993

Political View: Ginsburg is generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court

Education: Cornell University -- Harvard University -- Columbia University

Justice Bryer

Associate Justice Stephen Breyer(MA) (Born in 1938)

Appointed by: President B. Clinton -Democrat in 1994

Political View: Breyer is generally associated with the more liberal side of the Court

Education: Stanford University -- Magdalen College, Oxford -- Harvard University

Justice Alito

Associate Justice Samuel Alito (NJ) (Born in 1950)

Appointed by: President G. W. Bush - Republican in 2006

Political View: Alito has been described by the Cato Institute as a conservative jurist with a libertarian streak.

Education: Princeton University -- Yale University

Justice Sotomayor

Associate Justice Sonia Sotomayor (NY) - (Born in 1954)

Appointed by: President B. Obama (Democrat) in 2009

Political View: Sotomayor has been a reliable member of the liberal bloc when the justices divide along the commonly perceived ideological lines.

Education:Princeton University -- Yale University

Justice Kagan

Associate Justice Helena Kagan (MA) - (Born in 1960)

Appointed by: President B. Obama - Democrat in 2010

Political View: Kagan has been a reliable member of the liberal bloc when the justices divide along the commonly perceived ideological lines

Education: Princeton University -- Worcester College, Oxford -- Harvard University

Federal Judges Term


Federal judges can only be removed through impeachment by the House of Representatives and conviction in the Senate. They serve until their death, retirement, or conviction by the Senate.

Note

The Constitution states that Justices "shall hold their Offices during good Behaviour." This means that the Justices hold office as long as they choose and can only be removed from office by impeachment.

Did you know?

The only Justice to be impeached was Associate Justice Samuel Chase in 1805. The House of Representatives passed Articles of Impeachment against him; however, he was acquitted by the Senate.

How many courts of appeals are there?

There are 13 judicial circuits, each with a court of appeals. The smallest court is the First Circuit with six judgeships, and the largest court is the Ninth Circuit, with 29 judgeships. A list of the states that compose each circuit is set forth in Title 28 of the U.S. Code, Section 41. The number of judgeships in each circuit is set forth in Title 28 of the U.S. Code, Section 44

How many district courts are there?

There are 89 districts in the 50 states, which are listed with their divisions in Title 28 of the U.S. Code, Sections 81-144. District courts also exist in Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, the District of Columbia, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands. In total there are 94 U.S. district courts. Some states, such as Alaska, are composed of a single judicial district. Others, such as California, are composed of multiple judicial districts. The number of judgeships allotted to each district is set forth in Title 28 of the U.S. Code, Section 133.

American Political System

The Constitution

The American political system is clearly defined by basic documents. The Declaration of Independence of 1776 and the Constitution of 1789 form the foundations of the United States federal government.

The United States Constitution is the shortest written constitution in the world with just seven articles and 27 amendments.The first ten amendments were all carried in 1789 - the same year as the original constitution - and are collectively known as the Bill of Rights. If one accepts that these first 10 amendments were in effect part of the original constitutional settlement, there have only been 17 amendments in over 200 years (the last substantive one - reduction of the voting age to 18 - in 1971)

The President

The President is both the head of state and the head of government, as well as the military commander-in-chief and chief diplomat. He presides over the executive branch of the federal government, a vast organisation numbering about 4 million people, including 1 million active-duty military personnel. Within the executive branch, the President has broad constitutional powers to manage national affairs and the workings of the federal government and he may issue executive orders to affect internal policies.

The Cabinet and independent federal agencies are responsible for the day-to-day enforcement and administration of federal laws. These departments and agencies have missions and responsibilities as widely divergent as those of the Department of Defense and the Environmental Protection Agency, the Social Security Administration and the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Congress

Established by Article I of the Constitution, the Legislative Branch consists of the House of Representatives and the Senate, which together form the United States Congress. The Constitution grants Congress the sole authority to enact legislation and declare war, the right to confirm or reject many Presidential appointments, and substantial investigative powers.

The House of Representatives is made up of 435 elected members, divided among the 50 states in proportion to their total population. In addition, there are 6 non-voting members, representing the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and four other territories of the United States. The presiding officer of the chamber is the Speaker of the House, elected by the Representatives. He or she is third in the line of succession to the Presidency.

The Supreme Court

Where the Executive and Legislative branches are elected by the people, members of the Judicial Branch are appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Federal courts enjoy the sole power to interpret the law, determine the constitutionality of the law, and apply it to individual cases.

Article III of the Constitution, which establishes the Judicial Branch, leaves Congress significant discretion to determine the shape and structure of the federal judiciary. Even the number of Supreme Court Justices is left to Congress (the current number is nine, with one Chief Justice and eight Associate Justices).

State & Local Government

Each state has its own written constitution, and these documents are often far more elaborate than their federal counterpart.

Under the Tenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, all powers not granted to the federal government are reserved for the states and the people. All state governments are modeled after the federal government and consist of three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial.

The Executive Branch

In every state, the executive branch is headed by a governor who is directly elected by the people. In most states, the other leaders in the executive branch are also directly elected, including the lieutenant governor, the attorney general, the secretary of state, and auditors and commissioners.

Local governments generally include two tiers: counties, also known as boroughs in Alaska and parishes in Louisiana, and municipalities, or cities/towns. In some states, counties are divided into townships. Municipalities can be structured in many ways, as defined by state constitutions, and are called, variously, townships, villages, boroughs, cities, or towns. Various kinds of districts also provide functions in local government outside county or municipal boundaries, such as school districts or fire protection districts.

The Legislative Branch

All 50 states have legislatures made up of elected representatives, who consider matters brought forth by the governor or introduced by its members to create legislation that becomes law. The legislature also approves a state's budget and initiates tax legislation and articles of impeachment.

Except for one state, Nebraska, all states have a bicameral legislature made up of two chambers: a smaller upper house and a larger lower house. Together the two chambers make state laws and fulfill other governing responsibilities. (Nebraska is the lone state that has just one chamber in its legislature.) The smaller upper chamber is always called the Senate, and its members generally serve longer terms, usually four years. The larger lower chamber is most often called the House of Representatives, but some states call it the Assembly or the House of Delegates.

The Judicial Branch

State judicial branches are usually led by the state supreme court, which hears appeals from lower-level state courts. Court structures and judicial appointments/elections are determined either by legislation or the state constitution. The Supreme Court focuses on correcting errors made in lower courts and therefore holds no trials. Rulings made in state supreme courts are normally binding; however, when questions are raised regarding consistency with the U.S. Constitution, matters may be appealed directly to the United States Supreme Court.

RECOMMENDED READING

State Legislation on Voter ID

There are several situations when voters need to show identification before voting. Usually, ID is required to prove the voter's identity and residency at the address of the registration. ... Read more

State Legislation on Minimum Wage

Minimum wages will go up in 13 states on Jan. 1, 2016 because of indexed increases in their state law: Alaska, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont and West Virginia. ... Read more

Early and Absentee Voting

Early voting varies by state and typically ends a few days before Election Day. It starts as early as 45 days before the election but the average starting time is 22 days. Often, the time to vote early ranges from four days to 45 days but on average 19 days is the average length across all 33 states ... Read more

Voter Registration Deadlines

You can register to vote by mail using the National Mail Voter Registration Form and almost all states allow voters to vote by mail. States that do not accept the National Mail Voter Registration Form are North Dakota, Wyoming, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. New Hampshire accepts it only as a request for an absentee voter mail-in registration form, according to USA.gov ... Read more

HEADLINES
US CONGRESS
Top ten most-viewed bills
RankBill
#1 H.R.2029: Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2016
#2 H.Res.642: Recognizing magic as a rare and valuable art form and national treasure
#3 H.R.1314: Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015
#4 H.R.3799: Hearing Protection Act of 2015
#5 H.R.636: America's Small Business Tax Relief Act of 2015
#6 S.1890: Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2016
#7 H.R.4269: Assault Weapons Ban of 2015
#8 H.R.711: Equal Treatment of Public Servants Act of 2015
#9 S.1177: Every Student Succeeds Act
#10 H.R.4742: Promoting Women in Entrepreneurship Act
What's On The House Floor This Week?
BillTitle
S.2512Adding Zika Virus to the FDA Priority Review Voucher Program Act
H.R.2947Financial Institution Bankruptcy Act of 2016
H.R.4676Preventing Crimes Against Veterans Act of 2016, as amended
H.R.1567Global Food Security Act of 2016, as amended
H.R.3586Border and Maritime Coordination Improvement Act, as amended
H.R.4482Southwest Border Security Threat Assessment Act of 2016, as amended
H.R.4509State and High-Risk Urban Area Working Group Act, as amended
H.R.4549Treating Small Airports with Fairness Act of 2016, as amended
H.R.4403Enhancing Overseas Traveler Vetting Act, as amended
H.R.2666No Rate Regulation of Broadband Internet Access Act
H.R.3340Financial Stability Oversight Council Reform Act
H.R.3791To raise the consolidated assets threshold under the small bank holding company policy statement, and for other purposes.
What's On The Senate Floor This Week?
BillTitle
H.R.636 To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to permanently extend increased expensing limitations, and for other purposes.
S.Amdt.3679 In the nature of a substitute.
S.Amdt.3680 To strike and replace section 4105.
H.R.1670 To direct the Architect of the Capitol to place in the United States Capitol a chair honoring American Prisoners of War Missingin Action.
H.R.2028 Making appropriations for energy and water development and related agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2016, and for other purposes.
S.1436 To require the Secretary of the Interior to take land into trust for certain Indian tribes, and for other purposes.
S.Res.311 A resolution honoring Rutgers, the State Universityof New Jersey, as Rutgers celebrates its 250th anniversary.
S.Res.427 A resolution designating April 2016 as "Financial Literacy Month".
S.Res.428 A resolution congratulating the 2016 national champions, the University of South Dakota Coyotes, for winning the 2016 Women's National Invitation Tournament.
S.Res.429 A resolution expressing support for the designationof the week of April 11 through April 15, 2016, as "National Assistant Principals Week".
S.Res.430 A resolution supporting the designation of April 20, 2016, as "Cheyenne Mountain Day".
Good To Know

Election Day in the United States of America is the Tuesday following the first Monday in November. It can fall on or between November 2 and November 8. It is the day when popular ballots are held to select public officials. These include national, state and local government representatives at all levels up to the president.

-- timeanddate.com
Voter Registration Deadlines

May 15,2016 - Nevada (Primary Election):

First Day for In-Office and Online Registration (10 Days, May 15-24): You may register to vote or update your existing registration ONLY by the following means: (1) In-person at the Election Department offices; or (2) On the the Secretary of State\'s Internet site
Early Voting Starts

May 2,2016 - Idaho (Primary Election):

First day to begin Early Voting at the Early Voting Polling Place for the Primary Election (May 17) for those counties who elect to conduct Early Voting.

May 28,2016 - Nevada (Primary Election):

First day for Early Voting (14 Days, May 28 - June 10): Any voter registered may vote at any early voting site within the County. Hours and days vary by location.
Early Voting Ends

May 7,2016 - West Virginia (Primary Election):

Early Voting is open during regular business hours at each Primary: county courthouse or courthouse annex. Early Voting is also available each Saturday from 9:00am to 5:00pm. Contact your County Clerk to confirm Early Voting hours and locations.
Absentee Voting Deadlines

May 2,2016 - Indiana (Primary Election):

By noon, for circuit court clerks to receive absentee ballot applications from confined voters or voters caring for a confined person requesting delivery of a ballot by an absentee voter board

May 10,2016 - Kentucky (Presidential Preference Primary Election):

Last day to apply for mail-in absentee ballot. Applications must be received by this day. Note: Only qualified voters can vote absentee. This includes: Advanced in age, disabled or ill; Military personnel, their Dependents, or Overseas Citizens. Other circumstances may qualify for absentee voting. Check with election officials for eligibility.

May 27,2016 - Colorado (Primary Election):

Last day for voters who are affiliated with a political party to change or withdraw their affiliation if they wish to vote in a different party\'s primary election. Note: Unaffiliated voters may affiliate at any time before and through the day of the primary election.
Presidential Executive Orders Since 1937
PresidentDatesTotal Issued
Barack Obama 2009-Present227
Dwight D. Eisenhower 1953-1961486
Franklin D. Roosevelt 1933-19452019
George Bush 1989-1993166
George W. Bush 2001-2009291
Gerald R. Ford 1974-1977169
Harry S. Truman 1945-1953901
Jimmy Carter 1977-1981320
John F. Kennedy 1961-1963214
Lyndon B. Johnson 1963-1969324
Richard Nixon 1969-1974346
Ronald Reagan 1981-1989381
William J. Clinton 1993-2001364
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